The Cinema Century – March 30, 1918

One century ago, in its March 30, 1918 edition, “Motion Picture News” noted the upcoming release of a couple of new comedy short subjects from Mack Sennett: Interestingly enough, these Sennett comedies were not Keystone releases. In retrospect we tend to think of the name of Mack Sennett as inseparable from the Keystone brand under …

The Cinema Century – March 23, 1918

One century ago, in its March 23, 1918 issue, “Motion Picture News” noted that the Ince Studio was operating ahead of schedule: To those familiar with the operations of the Ince Studio, this would hardly have been surprising. Whatever else one could say about the studio head, Thomas H. Ince, no one would deny that …

The Cinema Century – March 16, 1918

One century ago this week a startling ad ran in the March 16, 1918 edition of the trade publication “Moving Picture World.” The bold two-page spread was run by Carl Laemmle (LEM-lee) of Universal Pictures. In large type in the header and footer of the ad, Laemmle extended to his movie industry colleagues “An invitation …

The Cinema Century – March 9, 1918

One century ago this week, in its March 9, 1918 edition, “Exhibitors Herald” noted in passing a new process for shooting motion pictures in color: The process developed by Leon F. Douglass was by no means the first attempt at screening color movies. The impulse to add color to black and white monochrome film asserted …

The Cinema Century — March 2, 1918

In the industry trade papers one century ago this week there was considerable buzz about the spacious and ornate new theater opened by Sid Grauman at 307 S. Broadway in Los Angeles, across the street from the famed Bradbury Building. The March 2, 1918 issue of “Motion Picture News” featured an entire section dedicated to …

The Cinema Century — February 23, 1918

Believe it or not, there was a time when movie producers deliberately refrained from publicizing the names of the actors who appeared in their films. Their reasoning was that there would inevitably be some actors whose work pleased the moviegoing public more than others. If the public knew their names, they could ask for movies …

The Cinema Century — February 16, 1918

One century ago this week, the trade paper “Moving Picture World” announced that Charles Chaplin had begun work on the first production in his newly constructed studio. This would turn out to be A DOG’S LIFE (1918), his first film for First National. Producing films for First National was different from the work he had …